September 21, 2016

Uses for Baling Wire


Baling wire. We have a ton of it. There must be uses for it, right? Other than being wrapped around hay bales, I mean.

Re-uses for baling wire.

Some uses are obvious: tying gates shut, and wiring things together like fencing to fenceposts. Most of ours ends up in a pile of bundles of rusted wire. But there must be more to the life of a piece of baling wire than being thrown out to rust.

So one day I gathered a piece of wire right off the haybale, a pair of wire cutters, and my needle-nosed pliers. A curlicue on the end, a bend here and there, some measuring, and this was born:

How to make a photo holder from baling wire.

What is it, you ask? It's a photo holder for my desk:

Uses for baling wire.

You're right, that's a postcard, not a photo - used for illustrative purposes only.

A favorite postcard on display in a baling wire holder.

I was inspired by this little widget:

Inspiration from a collapsible photo holder.

A slightly larger one could hold a book on display, a framed photo, or a file folder or two.

Baling wire can hold just about anything to just about anything. Short lengths of baling wire are wrapped around the top bar of our swingset and hold S hooks that then hold the hummingbird feeders.

I've used lengths of baling wire as marshmallow toasters. Just stick a marshmallow on one of the pointed ends and hold over a bonfire for ooey-gooey goodness.

I even found an ebook about wire crafts that's free to download. Several of the projects would be great for baling wire.

As a last resort you can take your rusty baling wire to the metal recycler. My son-in-law says it's classed as "miscellaneous steel."

I'm sure there are other uses for this endless resource. Have you made anything from baling wire?


This post has been shared at some of my favorite blog hops.


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20 comments:

  1. How wise! :) So useful! Thanks for sharing.
    Love Carra

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  2. Oh, I love this! It's so pretty, and I like both options.
    I think you could sell these, IF you only had free time to make them! ;)

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  3. OH I love this idea!!! Perfect timing too, as I'm looking for ways to make plate holders and other decorative accents for in my Kitchen using wire. Thinking there will be a stop at my local farming supply store in the near future (I don't have any hay bales :( )

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  4. Ricki, I love perfect timing. :-)

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  5. Very clever! Out here our bales are held together with twine. Wire is no longer used. I save the twine for all kinds of things like wrapping gifts, tying up plants and trees. Aha! I have a new idea for a blog post....

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    1. Aha! There you go!

      It depends on who I buy hay from as to whether it is wrapped with twine or wire. Round bales have twine or netting.

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  6. Great post! You reminded me of our giant stack in the back! lol I've been meaning to figure out what to do with it...I can't bear to toss it, and I know it's useful! I'm going to give this project a try! Thanks! Heidi

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    1. I hope you love the final product, Heidi. :-)

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  7. Call me naive, but I didn't know hay bales were held together by wire...I've always just seen it with twine. However, that photo holder is adorable, you could sell them!

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    1. I think it's sort of regional, Katy. I've found square bales here with twine or wire, but in some areas it seems to be one or the other. Thank you, that photo holder is super simple and fun to make. :-)

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  8. This is such a good idea I have a pile of this stuff in our barn I was trying to figure out some kind of use for! Also, we would love to have you at our To Grandma's house we go linky party :)

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    1. Thank you, Tarahlynn.

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  9. Morning, I like this idea, I have used the thinner stuff for a picture hanger and also a craft wire for my plank board signs...
    Thanks for sharing!
    Roxy

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    1. Hi Roxy. "Use what we have on hand" is the homesteading motto, isn't it? Your plank board signs sound interesting.

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  10. Anonymous6:54 PM

    Bale wire comes into big use training Blackberry canes to my fence. I first bend it into a spiral "spring" and take the ends and anchor them to my fence, by the hundreds! I train the berry canes to grow through the spirals. This allows the canes to grow thick without suffering "girdling" of wire. You've seen this when barbed wire is wrapped around tree trunks. The spirals also have another purpose, to make it difficult on raccoons who might attempt to climb over the fence. I've even anchored my rose stem cuttings and gooseberry stem cuttings with the spirals on the top wire, pretty nasty to tangle with. The spirals are anchored to the fence vertical & horizontal. It looks bad in the winter but come spring when the canes send out "side canes" at all the leaf digits, you can't see a single wire. It's like a waterfall of blooms and the fruit harvest is amazing! End of season I just cut back the side cane digits leaving the main canes on hte fence. Can't do it without that wire! Cheers and God Bless! - Sheri

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    1. Sheri, that's a great use for baling wire! Putting thorny things on top of the fence is a great idea too. I think I have a raccoon in the garden, so I'm going to put this to use.

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  11. You are so creative! Love this !Jan @ Tip Garden

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  12. Great idea! I am always looking to repurpose our farm cast offs! Thank you for sharing with us on the Art of Home-Making Mondays at Strangers & Pilgrims on Earth! :)

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    1. Thanks, Jes. This stuff just seems to multiply like weeds, doesn't it? I hope some of these uses sparked ideas for you.

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