This site uses affiliate links. See my full disclosure here.

July 31, 2013

Peppermint Essential Oil


A couple of years ago I read about treating headaches with peppermint essential oil. At the time I was suffering with regular debilitating migraines, and I'd tried just about everything. After I was diagnosed as being extremely anemic and eventually got that under control, the migraines lessened considerably, but I do still have an occasional headache.


This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, 
I may receive a small commission on the sale; however, this does not affect the 
price you pay. For more information, please see my disclosure page.


I'd bought a bottle of peppermint essential oil to use in scenting my goat milk soaps, and the next time I had a headache I remembered its use as a headache cure. I searched online and read that I should put a drop of the essential oil on each temple and one on the back of my neck. My headaches are usually in the back of my head, and are so bad that even my hair hurts.

Most people need to dilute peppermint essential oil before using, and I do recommend doing that. I didn't know better at first, and just put a drop in each spot, undiluted. It was a little strong near my eyes, and if I turned my head too quickly my eyes would water from the fumes. I'm more careful now, diluting the peppermint with a carrier oil such as sweet almond oil before use.


To have Oak Hill Homestead's new posts delivered to your inbox, click here.


At first the oil is warm, then it has a cooling sensation that is quite pleasant. In about 10-15 minutes my head no longer hurts. One application is usually all it takes, although a super-migraine requires that I re-apply the peppermint oil again a time or two during the day.

During a stressful week when I had several headaches, I wished I could carry this headache relief with me. I put some diluted peppermint essential oil in a tiny glass bottle with a tight cap (I had one little bottle on hand, but later I bought a set of these tiny cobalt glass roll-on bottles), then put it in a narrow prescription bottle for extra spill protection in my purse. Now I have it on hand to apply when needed, no matter where I am. I put just 1/4 ounce of diluted oil in the little bottle in my purse so there is less to spill, and I plan to sew an elastic loop to the lining of my purse too, to keep the bottle upright.


Headaches aren't the only thing that peppermint is good for. You can apply the essential oil to bug bites, massage on sore muscles, combine it with water as a cooling spray in the summertime. Peppermint also repels mice in your home, and the same cooling spray can be sprayed around door frames to discourage spiders from entering your house. (I wonder if it would also repel scorpions?) One drop of peppermint essential oil on the floor of a hot shower can help unstuff a stuffy nose. (By the way, when directions say to use one drop, use ONE DROP and no more. Essential oils are very strong and a little goes a long way.)


(I love this little set of measuring beakers - a Christmas gift from a friend - for measuring tiny amounts. It's a set of four that measures ounces, tablespoons, teaspoons, and milliliters. Measuring 1/4 ounce of the oil was easy.)

Most essential oils must be diluted before using on skin. A carrier oil such as almond oil, grapeseed oil, or jojoba oil is mixed with the essential oil. For a standard 2% dilution, mix 10-12 drops of essential oil with an ounce of carrier oil for the average adult. A 1% dilution (5-6 drops of essential oil to one ounce of carrier oil) is appropriate for children, the elderly and chronically ill.


Before using this or any other essential oil, please research the oil you plan to use. Some essential oils are stronger than others and must be diluted further. Some essential oils are not recommended for use during pregnancy. I do not recommend using essential oils internally. Please remember that you are responsible for your own health.


This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a small commission on the sale; however, this does not affect the price you pay. Any opinions and recommendations in this post are mine alone. For more information, please see my disclosure page.




This post has been shared at some of my favorite blog hops.


~~~~~

My hope is to inspire you, and to encourage your homesteading plans and your dreams of a simple, self-reliant, God-dependent life. You can follow me at:
Facebook | Pinterest | Bloglovin | Subscribe via email

3 comments:

  1. I use peppermint EO for my goats to relieve a congested udder. I've used it on a doe that freshened with mastitis and had all the symptoms gone in just a couple of days.

    I've never used it for a headache but will keep that in mind for sure!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I've read about using it on congested udders. It's good to know that works!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I mix carrier oil, lavender oil, and peppermint oil together in a small spray for sunburns. The lavender soothes and heals the skin, and the peppermint takes the burn out and gives relief.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for stopping by. I hope you will leave a comment - I would love to hear from you. If you wish to email me instead, please click here. Thank you!

Please note that anonymous comments are usually deleted unread because of the high amount of spam. Instead of commenting anonymously, consider choosing the NAME/URL option - just fill in your name, leaving a URL is optional.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...