March 9, 2016

Timberrrrrr!


Before moving to Oklahoma I didn't even know what a "gust front" was. In case you don't know either, Wikipedia defines it as:

"An outflow boundary, also known as a gust front, is a storm-scale or mesoscale boundary separating thunderstorm-cooled air (outflow) from the surrounding air; similar in effect to a cold front, with passage marked by a wind shift and usually a drop in temperature and a related pressure jump."

Sunday, although we didn't get any rain from it, we had a big gust front blow through that violently shook the trees we see out the front windows. The dogs began barking frantically and ran over to the corner of the yard; our Anatolian/Pyrenees LGD Rosie was barking and baying from her pen too. Hubby went out to investigate and found this:

An oak tree fell in the goat's fence.

This tree in a corner of the goat yard has been dead for a couple of years, and I was wondering how we'd get it down without it hitting the old goat shed in the photos, the new goat shed, or the fence. I don't have to wonder any more. Of the three, the fence is the most easily and cheaply fixed, so I guess that's a good thing.

Fallen oak tree

I think the only thing that kept it from totally smashing the wire fence was the wooden pallet I used as a fence between the buck pen and the does' yard. My buck had occasionally been able to get through the wire fencing in that spot, so I augmented it with the pallet. It was strong enough to keep the fallen tree from completely taking out the fence, with some damage to the pallet though.

Fallen tree missed the goat shed

It missed the old shed by inches.

Fallen oak tree in the goat pen

I don't have a buck at the moment so I don't have to worry about the fencing behind the shed, but you can imagine that the does could easily hop on top of that fallen trunk and walk along it to freedom - or even to the roof of the old shed which I'm sure wouldn't hold their weight!

The goat yard has a strange fencing configuration - a small, older pen within their newer larger yard - so I just shut the gate to the smaller pen where the tree is to keep them out of trouble. They have the new shed for shelter from the coming week's rain. After the storms we can get the chainsaw out and take care of the tree trunk as well as fix the fence.

We haven't had "real" thunderstorms for a couple of years, and we used to lose an average of one tree per year to storms but haven't since the mimosa tree was struck by lightning. Evidently it's back to normal around here now.

Do you like thunderstorms or hate them?




This post has been shared at some of my favorite blog hops.


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12 comments:

  1. Oh wow, looks like you lucked out. Nice firewood, too. I hate thunderstorms, especially as a kid living back east. We had a lot of them there. We have a few here in summer and they are scary cause they cause forest fires. We have more high winds than we have ever had now.

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    1. Thank you, Tewshooz, I do think we were fortunate that it missed all the important targets. Fences are pretty easy to repair. Wildfires are definitely something to be afraid of.

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  2. This sounds like the "duratio" that went through our farm in 2012. We lost lots of old apple trees but mostly old oaks that were beautiful. We got more than enough firewood and shared a lot of it with friends too.

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    1. Wow, Rita, did you lose all those trees in one storm? That's quite a lot of damage, and such a change in the landscape, isn't it? At least fallen trees give us the benefit of firewood so they're not truly wasted.

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  3. We had a huge wind storm last night and I woke to a tree cracking and falling behind our condo building. We had beavers in the creek several years ago and lots of trees died with wet roots. Now they are falling. - Margy

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    1. Margy, I didn't realize that beavers could kill trees that way. It's a shame so many trees have died, and I imagine it was quite scary to have one falling right behind your building!

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  4. What a fortunate drop. That was so close to the shed. Nature is always amazing.
    And, I love thunderstorms but don't like harsh wind. I must be difficult:)

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    1. It was really a close call. I'm like you, don't like the wind but really do like thunderstorms. They are so awesome, aren't they!?

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  5. I don't mind thunderstorms, but I hate the winds! We get very high winds in England and they can be so damaging. I'm sorry your tree fell down - I'm very glad it missed the shed, Kathi! Thank you for sharing this post with us at the Hearth and Soul Hop.

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    1. The wind bothers me as well, April. Thank you!

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  6. Whew! That could have been so much worse. Glad no one was hurt.

    I love thunderstorms, as long as I can be home hunkered down with a good book and a cup of joe in my favorite cozy chair!

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    1. That sounds like the perfect place to ride out a thunderstorm, Daisy.

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