May 18, 2016

When the Wild Roses Bloom


Wild roses herald the beginning of summer. Some years, when we have abundant rainfall, they are prolific and beautiful. Of all the wildflowers that bloom here, the wild roses seem magical and lift my spirits.

Bright pink, double wild roses

In drier years they don't put on quite as magnificent a show, but they are still beautiful.


This patch of double wild roses was removed from its fenceline when a nearby home was sold last year. The new owners replaced the barbed wire fence and cleaned out the underbrush, including the wild roses.

Wild hedge roses

We have a patch of pale pink wild roses growing way out in the far corner of our place where the seasonal creek runs. Ours are just now beginning to bloom, but as I drive to town I pass several large roadside patches of the brighter, double roses that have been blooming for awhile.

Pale pink wild roses

My wild roses are single blossoms, while the brighter pink ones are fuller.

Pale pink wild roses

The wild roses bloom briefly, then disappear until next year, from the middle of May until early June, right around Memorial Day.

Wild roses

Roses can be used in luxurious homemade skin care products such as toner, lotion and body cream, and to make infused honey and even tea. Gather wild blooms or petals from rosebushes that you know haven't been sprayed with herbicides, pesticides or other chemicals. This post from Wild Foods and Medicines has several lovely recipes you might want to try.



This post has been shared at some of my favorite blog hops.


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24 comments:

  1. Anonymous7:52 AM

    Beautiful photographs. I don't have wild roses but do have an unusual rescued rose off the Northern Coast of Oregon. It's an Alba Rose ‘Félicité Parmentier’. It dates back to Rome and the time Jesus lived.
    Cheers! Sheri

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    1. What a rich history, Sheri. That rose is beautiful just by its nature, nevermind the blooms - but they are gorgeous too (I looked it up on Google. "Pale pink and very fragrant"!)

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  2. Hi Kathi,
    I love wild roses - their aroma is unbelievable. I love your pictures. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thank you, Marla. Wild roses smell heavenly, don't they?

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  3. Pretty flowers, we don't grow roses in the mountains, too much trouble. But our azaleas do very well.

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    1. Azaleas are very pretty too, Carole. I wasn't familiar with them until we moved here to Oklahoma. They are very popular here.

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  4. Ah, the wild roses are lovely! We see a lot of them banking the shores here on PEI. Their scent is so intoxicating. God created a beautiful world. Thanks for sharing and Happy Memorial Day!

    Blessings,
    Sandi

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    1. Wild roses lend such a magical air to the world, and I'm so thankful the Lord created them. Beach roses have a magic all their own and you are so fortunate to be able to enjoy them, Sandi.

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  5. Your wild roses are so beautiful. We have the yellow/orange and red wild roses that I call my living fence behind the house. So beautiful this year and yep thanks to the rain-they are abundant as the regular roses up front with huge blooms this year.
    Thanks for sharing

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    1. That must be breathtaking, Casoppia. How beautiful.

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  6. I have loved wild roses for years. Thank you for the sweet memories. I can still remember the first bush I saw as a kid - after we'd moved from the California desert to the Michigan woods. I was in love at first sight. :-) We don't see them in this part of Texas where my husband and I live now, but we had them in Tennessee.

    You can make jelly out of rose petals too, by the way. I don't know what it would taste like, not having made it.

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    1. Great minds think alike, Mary. I'm planning to make some rose petal jelly as soon as there are enough roses in bloom. :-)

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  7. I don't think I've ever seen wild roses before. I always thought roses were fussy, and I am pleasantly surprised that they grow on their own like this. Thanks for teaching me something new-again!
    So glad you joined The Maple Hill Hop this week!

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    1. I always thought they were fussy too, Daisy, but I also have some cultivated roses for the first time in my life and they're pretty easy-going as well.

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  8. Such beautiful flowers, great photos. Thanks for sharing

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    1. They are gorgeous indeed, Carol. Thank you.

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  9. These are beautiful! I wish we had the wild variety blooming in our area! I would love to forage for those medicinal rose hips! Thank you for sharing on the Art of Home-Making Mondays this week!

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    1. I'm planning to do that this year too, Jes!

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  10. What gorgeous wild roses, Kathi! I always think there is something special about roses growing wild like that. Thank you for sharing this post with us at the Hearth and Soul Hop.

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    1. They truly are special, thank you, April.

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  11. Hurray for summer! These are some lovely colors of pink.

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    1. Thank you, Betty. :-)

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