June 13, 2016

What About the Goats?


When we first moved to Oak Hill almost twelve years ago, we brought our three dairy goats along with us. What a fun move that was!


My main focus was on our goats back then. Our daughter and I bred goats, milked goats, sold goats, and showed goats at the county fair. Her 4-H project was dairy goats. Eventually we had quite a large herd.


Goats - Oak Hill Homestead

Our daughter grew up and went off to a new life in another state, and I downsized a bit. Then we had a tragic barn fire and lost the entire herd.

For a month after that, I wasn't even sure I would start over with goats. It was a dark time, but the Lord held me close and sustained me. Hubby bought me a little bottle doe and sweet friends gave me kids from their herds.


I promised hubby that I'd keep my numbers down this time. Currently I have just three Nubian does: Phoenix, Firefly and Ziva. I'm back where I started twelve years ago.

Last fall I didn't breed them. Hubby had been diagnosed with cancer and we thought it wise to slow way down on anything extra for awhile, not knowing what the future might bring. It was a good decision.


But you've been asking me about my goats because there haven't been many posts about them in recent months. Yes, I do still have them. There are no sweet, bouncy goat kids this year though, and I'm bartering milk from a goat-milking friend. I do miss milking, and I miss goat kid antics, but life has been hectic enough this spring and summer.

And since you've asked, here are a couple of goat posts from the past that might have an answer you're looking for.




How (and Why) I Milk Once a Day




Why You Should Have Goats on Your Homestead





Goats: What's Normal?





More of my posts about goats


Do you raise dairy goats? Leave a comment below and tell us about them!




This post has been shared at some of my favorite blog hops.


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My hope is to inspire you, and to encourage your homesteading plans and your dreams of a simple, self-reliant, God-dependent life. You can follow me at:
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14 comments:

  1. I love our goats. We started with 2 4-H boer goats, but we're slowly growing our herd. I'm not sure how big I'll allow it to get just yet. But not breeding when life is too busy is smart.

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    1. It's so easy to grow the herd, isn't it, Jamie? Goats have such personality and those babies are just so cute!

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  2. It sounds like you have just what you need. They are so sweet and you've certainly peaked my curiosity about having them on our future homestead.
    Thank you for sharing your outdoor post on today's Maple Hill Hop!

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    1. Thank you, Daisy. Love the Maple Hill Hop!

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  3. I started out with one dairy goat last year and I was loving it, but we moved and we are having our third child this summer so we sold her. :( I hope to buy more next year.

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    1. I'm sorry you had to sell her, but hopefully you were just postponing goat ownership and will soon have more. Congratulations on the soon-to-come new addition to your family!

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  4. Awe! They are all so cute! We are still debating the commitment to dairy goats around here but love seeing yours!

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    1. Thank you, Stephanie. They are such sweeties. One way to lessen the commitment is to milk once a day and let the kids take care of the evening milking for you - and if you need to leave home early in the morning or for a weekend, just leave the kids with the does and no milking is necessary. That said, they do still have to be fed though. ;-)

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  5. Your goats are so lovely! I can't imagine what it must have been like to lose an entire herd of goats, Kathi. I'm so sorry that happened to you. I hope your hubby is doing well. Thank you for sharing your lovely photos and the links to the articles to help others who are raising goats with us at the Hearth and Soul Hop.

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    1. Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment, April. I have to be honest, the fire and the loss of my goats were devastating.

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  6. We are still thinking about getting a goat or two some day. I'd love to have them as brush clearers! We have weed control covered with the chickens. ;)

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    1. They're great at brush control, Alicia, just make sure you have good fences to keep them where you want them. :-)

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  7. Love your goats! Very beautiful does. We inherited a runaway male goat who followed my son home and now he doesn't want to go anywhere else! :-) Poor guy. I know nothing about goats, so I like hearing what others are doing. I would really like to find him a doe, but I am a little uncertain about adding babies to my duties. He is not castrated. Prayers for your husband and your family's healing.

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    1. Kim, I have a friend who had a runaway male goat show up on her doorstep several years ago. She had does though, so he knew where he was headed and why! I hope you can decide what to do about this guy, and I'm glad that you have taken him in for at least awhile and are caring for him. Poor guy. Thank you for your prayers!

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