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October 6, 2017

The Chicken Chick's Guide to Backyard Chickens, a Review


This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase after following one of these
links, I will receive a small commission that does not affect the price you pay in any way. 
You can read my full disclosure here.


Are you intrigued by the idea of keeping chickens in your backyard? Kathy Shea Mormino's new book will help you get started on the right foot.

Have you been bitten by the "chicken bug" yet? Wouldn't you love to have a few adorable fluffy-feathered hens roaming contentedly around your backyard and wiping out the bug population? Not to mention that they give you eggs for breakfast.

And if you were wanting to get a few chickens for your backyard, wouldn't you love to have an expert help you get started?

That expert is Kathy Shea Mormino, known worldwide as The Chicken Chick. Kathy has been blogging about backyard chickens for many years and now she's written THE book about chicken-keeping: The Chicken Chick's Guide to Backyard Chickens, Simple Steps for Healthy, Happy Hens.


NOTE: I was given a free copy of "The Chicken Chick's Guide to Backyard Chickens" so I could write this review; however all opinions expressed in this post are my own. 
I will only review items that I'm sure you will love!

Kathy holds your hand from the very first page. Her book is packed with practical, sound advice. She'll help you set up your coop the right way and help you decide which chicks to purchase. From the brooder to the coop (and by the way, her coops are adorable!) you'll know how to care for your flock with confidence.


Would you like to have chickens in your backyard? Kathy Shea Mormino's new book will help you get started on the right foot.
(By the way, these are my photos. The photographs in Kathy's book are MUCH prettier!)


Five Reasons Why You Should Read This Book


1. Kathy helps you navigate your town's zoning restrictions to be sure your new pets will be legal. (I'd be heartbroken if I fell in love with my new chickens only to have to rehome them because they weren't allowed in my neighborhood.)

2. Two chapters cover chicken health, going deep into the basics of keeping your flock healthy as well as what to do when one of your pets is ill. 

3. You'll discover Kathy's favorite bedding material for her chickens' coop and run. (It's my favorite too.)

4. The photographs are beautiful!

5. Throughout the book, Kathy's favorite chicken Rachel recommends, reminds, and reveals secrets of chicken care. Sadly, Rachel recently passed away, but her wisdom will live on in Kathy's book.


Whether you're considering chickens or you've had a flock for awhile, you'll learn something new from The Chicken Chick's Guide to Backyard Chickens. I've had my chickens for more than fifteen years but I learned a great deal about chicken health from this book.

Kathy hopes to foster appreciation for chickens as unique pets and to help new keepers give their flock the best care possible. I think she accomplished that with flying colors.

A buff Orpington hen strolls through the chicken run.



Giveaway!


I'm thrilled to be able to offer you the opportunity to win a copy of The Chicken Chick's Guide to Backyard Chickens, Simple Steps to Healthy, Happy Hens. Just use the Giveaway Tools form below to enter.

This giveaway will open Friday, October 6, 2017 at 6:00 AM Central Time (CT) and close on Thursday, October 12, 2017 at 12:00 midnight CT. One winner will be chosen at random and notified by email. Winner will have 48 hours to respond; if there is no response an alternate winner will be chosen. Prize will be shipped by The Quarto Group.


Giveaway is closed. Congratulations to our winner, Kim J.!




This post contains affiliate links, including the one below. If you make a purchase after following one of these links, I will receive a small commission that will not affect the price you pay in any way. 
You can read my full disclosure here.

   


This post has been shared at some of my favorite blog hops.


~~~~~

My hope is to inspire you, and to encourage your homesteading plans and your dreams of a simple, self-reliant, God-dependent life. You can follow me at:
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*NOTE: Comments aren't showing up on the blog, but they are stored in the Giveaway Tools app and I can see them. Your entries ARE valid. The following have entered by leaving a comment, even though their comments aren't showing up here: Michelle V., Tina H., Melodie, Stephanie, Marie B., Margie A., Tracy J., Jane H., Greg V., Susan P., Joan VG., Melissa M., Amber., Sandy., Diana L., Michelle C., Kelly W., Jackie C., Tammy N., Anne P., Heather, Bri, Shelle, Cheryl M., Karen D., Toni R., Barb H., Annette W., Debbie S., Diva K., Rosz C., Marianne, Brenda.

34 comments:

  1. I'd be very interested to read her book! Her blog was the reason I got interested in having chickens in the first place :) My biggest question is how can I safely keep their water from freezing during the winter months. Last winter, the area between our coop and our house was a complete sheet of ice, and it was kind of scary walking over there to make sure they had their daily water! (I guess I need cleats for my boots!)

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    1. Danielle, Kathy does have a simple and inexpensive way to keep waterers from freezing on her blog. Walking across that ice does sound scary! I wonder how much cleats cost?

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  2. I love that her favorite chicken gives pointers throughout the book! I am often going to Kathy's site, The Chicken Chick, for pointers about my flock when I have a question so I'm certain I would LOVE a copy of this book! Thanks for offering this giveaway Kathi! I LOVE IT!!

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  3. I am fairly new to raising chickens, so I have lots of questions about everything. I would love to win this book. Thank you for the opportunity!

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  4. I would love to read that book! I've had chickens and other poultry for about ten years, but there's always more to learn, and I can appreciate pretty pictures of chickens. They're so beautiful, anyway. I'd love to meet Rachel, and see what tips she'd give other chicken owners.

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  5. I love this book! I plan to gift copies of it to friends of mine that either keep chickens or are interested in starting!

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    1. It would definitely be a great gift, Tammy!

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  6. Jackie C9:20 AM

    I read her blog ALL the time and have learned most everything by reading what the Chicken Chick posts. Also I enjoy her LIVE facebook posts, I dream of having just one hen house like hers!!!! Thank you for always being so informative and wonderful and honest!

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    Replies
    1. Isn't that coop adorable? I want one like it too!

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  7. I am wondering how yo set a broken wing.

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  8. I popped over here from The Chicken Chick's Facebook page. I'm so happy to have found your great blog and I lover your review of her book. Her site is my go to place for chicken related info.

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  9. Anonymous9:47 AM

    Great review! Thank you for the contest!

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  10. Great review!! Thank you for the contest!!

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  11. I'm a transplant to Central Texas and the weather is so much hotter than the Pacific Northwest. Are there any special tricks I need to know to keep chickens cool in the summer?

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  12. I will truly miss Rachel,she was a true queen of the yard.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, she truly was. I was so sorry to read of her passing.

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  13. Cheryl Murphy10:35 AM

    How do you know what type of drugs to give if you have a sick bird and no Poultry Vet available??

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    1. Kathy talks about this issue in her book, Cheryl. Not all vets will treat chickens so it's something we definitely need to know.

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  14. Do you know how much my chickens love to eat my rose petals? As much as they eat the grasshoppers.

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    Replies
    1. I had no idea that they liked rose petals, but I do know how much they like grasshoppers!

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  15. How cold should the coop be before it needs a little supplemental heat?

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    1. Chickens huddle together on the roost and hunker down over their feet, so they can withstand some pretty frigid temperatures. As long as the coop isn't damp or humid and there isn't a draft blowing on them, they should be fine. Also, breeds with smaller combs are better for cold climates; those big combs (such as the ones on my Rhode Island Red roos) are more prone to frostbite. Rose combs, pea combs and other small combs are a better choice.

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  16. This is a test comment. Test test.

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  17. What is the best kind of lighting to use in the winter months? I hesitate to use regular bulbs due to fire hazard but think fluorescents don't give off enough heat.

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    Replies
    1. It would depend on your goal, Mable. If you want to supplement the light so you'll have more eggs, a fluorescent light would probably be fine. I personally don't use heat lamps because of the fire danger, so if you decide to use those be sure you fasten them really securely!

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  18. What is the best thing to feed your chickens to help them digest food better?

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    Replies
    1. Grit, or if you have sand on the floor of your coop/run, that will be sufficient.

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  19. How much garden scraps to you recommend feeding your chickens? Like watermelon, tomatoes, etc. These are my girls favs.

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    1. I may give my 8 hens more garden scraps than is recommended. Watermelon and tomatoes help keep them hydrated. I feed them their layer feed in the morning and goodies in the afternoon, hoping that they are full enough that they won't overeat the treats.

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  20. Our biggest problem is predators.

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  21. I am an asthmatic and know I will have to wear a mask to clean the coop. I am wondering if it is over board to clean the coop daily or do I do it weekly? I have read up o the deep litter method and I could never do that, even if it does help keep the girls warmer in the winter.

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    Replies
    1. Heather, I agree that the deep litter method wouldn't be the best for you. I suggest you look into "droppings boards," where you have something under the roosts so you can just scrape the overnight droppings into a bucket each morning. That would be the majority of what needs to be cleaned out. You could do a more thorough cleaning weekly.

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  22. My question is about outside temperature - is there an optimum temperature for the chickens? I live in Phoenix, Arizona where it gets up to 120 degrees in the summer...

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    1. Audrey, I googled "keeping chickens in very hot climates" and found a lot of good advice. While we're not quite as hot in Oklahoma as you are, I make sure that my coop has lots of good ventilation, the run has a tarp on top for shade, and that the chickens have plenty of clean water. I've even put a big, shallow pan of water in the run that the hens can walk through to cool off (and they do!). If you have a broody hen in the height of summer, you'll need to make sure that she stays cool and hydrated. A cut up watermelon is a nice, cool treat that helps with hydration.

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