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April 30, 2012

Preventing Coccidiosis

It's spring, and many of us have goat kids hopping and skipping around. I have friends with their very first kid born. Last week I suddenly realized that my friends probably didn't know about coccidia or how to prevent problems. After having this conversation with them in person, I thought it might be a relevant blog post as well.

I've always used Di-Methox 40% for cocci prevention in my goat kids, but the 40% formula is no longer available. We can still purchase and use Di-Methox 12.5% instead. The recommended schedule is to dose the kid for 5 days every three weeks: day 1 at 1cc per 5 pounds of weight, days 2-5 at 1cc per 10 pounds. (A 20-lb kid would get 4 cc on the first day, 2 cc on the second through fifth days.)


There are other sulfa drugs that can be used instead of Di-Methox. For more information on coccidiosis see this article. Here's one on using Di-Methox from Hoegger Goat Supply, and a chart of other sulfa drugs from Fias Co Farm here. I've read in several places that Co-Rid is not a good choice for goats as it inhibites thiamine production.


Timing is very important when you are giving this as a preventive to coccidiosis. You want to begin when the kid is three weeks old. Don't procrastinate. I "worm on Wednesday" - it's easy for me to remember that way - so I move each kid's dose to the nearest Wednesday rather than their actual 3-week birthday.


The drug is given orally, using a syringe without a needle. I measure out a syringe for each kid before going outside. I hold one kid at a time, open her mouth and squirt it in.


Sulfadimethoxine is really bitter. The kids always spit and sputter and shudder after I give it to them. Once, years ago, a kid shook her head and a drop ended up in my open mouth - now I KNOW why they don't like it! YUCK! ICK! SPIT! GAG! A friend told me this week that she adds maple syrup to the syringe. I did that this week and it is obviously more pleasant for the babies.


Continue dosing your kids on schedule until they are weaned for best protection.


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2 comments:

  1. Kathi, Thank you for this very informative post. :) It's so lovely to hear this from another goat keeper.

    Coccidia can sometimes be the worst of enemies!

    Thank you for sharing what you've learned about keeping them under control.

    I had no idea that dimethox was so bitter! You have a very interesting, and so familiar! story of how you learned what it tasted like. :) Thank you for sharing that, it made me smile today.

    April and I are looking into treating our little kids this morning, and thank you so much.

    May Jesus Christ bless you. Praying for you in many special ways. :)
    In Christ,
    Carra

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  2. Helpful. Thanks!

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