August 3, 2015

Growing Walking Onions

This spring a friend gave me a clump of walking onions from her patch. I've been fascinated by them for some years and was thrilled to add them to my garden.

Walking onions are perennials; they overwinter and grow back when the weather warms up.

Now that it's July, the bulbs are getting some size to them, but there are still lots of tiny onion bulbs in that clump too. Each tiny bulb will grow into a new plant.
 
Why are they called walking onions? In late spring the plants bloom, just like regular onions. (I should have taken a picture then, but that's when hubby had his surgery so I had other things on my mind.) Walking onions don't make seeds though.


The flowers turn into little onion bulblets, and as the bulblets grow, they get heavy. The stalks bend over under the weight, and the bulblets touch the ground where they take root and grow more onion plants. Since I have mine in a large tub, the bulblets were trying to land in the grassy yard, so I encouraged them to stay in the tub. I wiggled a little depression into the soil with my finger, set the bulblet in the hole and nestled it into the loose soil. They'll take root here and grow more onions.
 
 
The hollow onion stalks can be cut and eaten like green onions. The onions can be harvested, but once you do, that plant won't grow back. Cutting the stalk with the bulblets will encourage the plant to grow larger onions. 
 
 
I'm not harvesting any of the onions this year, I'm letting the patch grow and become established, but eventually I can pull and eat some of the larger onion bulbs.
 
Don't you just love perennial vegetables?


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My hope is to inspire you, and to encourage your homesteading plans and your dreams of a
simple, self-reliant, God-dependent life. You can follow me at:
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August 2, 2015

Silver Sunday and Being Thankful

I am thankful to the Lord, my God, for:

- a cool evening to mow the lawn
- rain to water the garden
- the first red tomato
- my horse's velvety nose
- lasagna
Silver Sunday

For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord,
“plans to prosper you and not to harm you,
to give you hope and a future."
Jeremiah 29:11 (NIV)


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July 31, 2015

Friday Follow-Up



This week:

Mama Duck, my black-and-white Muscovy, has laid another clutch of eggs and has gone broody. I can't believe she's decided to do this during the hottest part of the summer and I worry about her; the waterer doesn't need to be filled as often so I know she isn't drinking as much as usual. Since she and the male are in a new location, it isn't as easy to count how many eggs she has in the nest this time. I hope she's more successful than last time, but I can guarantee her eggs are safe from snakes this time!

The farrier came out and trimmed the horses' hooves. He arrived at daybreak and we were finished by the time it got hot.

Hubby and I picked up the first two loads of our winter hay. Once again we started early in the day, and were finished in the field by 9:30 AM. I spent each morning this week unloading bales from the trailer and storing them safely out of the weather.


Each day I worked until I got too hot. The first two rows are easy; after that I use a few bales to make steps to help get the bales up on to the higher levels.


The bales are set on pallets so that they don't touch the ground. I'm careful to not stack bales too close to the open side of this three-sided shed so that rain and snow won't damage the bales.


My dog Pete came with me to keep me company. He enjoyed this out-of-the-ordinary task, but he wasn't much help.

This week's posts were:



 
and
 
 
 


My Friday Find:

These Apple Pie Granola Bars sound scrumptious - I'm on a granola kick right now, can you tell? This recipe uses both brown sugar and honey, plus a bit of corn syrup. I skipped the corn syrup, and I'd like to try using applesauce instead of some of the sweetener; the recipe says you can add more sweetener if it isn't sweet enough, but I'll use less than it calls for next time. They are very good and the house smelled delicious as they were baking.


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My hope is to inspire you, and to encourage your homesteading plans and your dreams of a
simple, self-reliant, God-dependent life. You can follow me at:
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July 29, 2015

Homemade Yogurt the Easy Way

Many years ago I discovered a very simple way to make yogurt. These days I use fresh milk from our goats, but way back in the early days of motherhood I used to make it with cow's milk from the grocery store; you can use either one. In addition to the milk, you'll also need a small container of plain yogurt with live, active cultures plus some powdered milk.



Use 2 quarts of milk, 2 tsp of yogurt, and 1 cup of powdered milk. The powdered milk is optional according to my cookbook (Goats Produce Too! by Mary Jane Toth) but I've never made it without. It makes the yogurt thicker.



Warm the milk to 115°F in a saucepan. Remove it from the heat and stir in the powdered milk, then the yogurt. Mix well with a whisk and pour into clean canning jars (pints or quarts) and add lids.

This is where my method gets real easy. You don't need a yogurt maker or a dehydrator. I put the jars into a small insulated cooler, then fill the cooler up to the "necks" of the jars, just below the lids, with hot water. Close the cooler and leave undisturbed for 6-8 hours. It's that simple.



Homemade yogurt is delicious on its own, in smoothies, with fruit or granola, and as a substitute for sour cream in recipes. You know what's in it and what isn't; it's good, wholesome food that's good for you and your family.

Don't forget to save some of this batch to use as a starter for your next batch of yogurt.



This post has been shared at some of my favorite blog hops.


~~~~~

My hope is to inspire you, and to encourage your homesteading plans and your dreams of a
simple, self-reliant, God-dependent life. You can follow me at:
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July 28, 2015

A Slice of My Life


How we spent our weekend,
picking up our first load of hay from the field.


This week's project is stacking it safely out of the weather
in preparation for winter.





This post has been shared at some of my favorite blog hops.


~~~~~

My hope is to inspire you, and to encourage your homesteading plans and your dreams of a
simple, self-reliant, God-dependent life. You can follow me at:
Facebook | Pinterest | Bloglovin | Subscribe via email
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