October 31, 2016

How to Make Your Own Bread Machine Mixes


I love homemade bread. I've made our bread by hand for several decades, but nowadays I use a shortcut.


I use my bread machine, but only on the "dough" cycle; it mixes, kneads, and raises the bread, then beeps and shuts off. Then I take the bread dough out of the machine, knead it, shape it and put it in my bread pan, and raise it again in a warm place for about an hour. When it's ready, I just pop the pan into the oven and bake it. One loaf at a time is enough for the two of us. My breadmaker actually makes a 1-pound loaf, but because I only use the dough cycle I can make a 1.5-pound loaf.

If you're making bread for a large family, a bread machine might not save you time or work, but read on... you too can benefit from making bread mixes to have in your cupboard, just on a larger scale. Or you could make mixes for bread machine use, package them in a canning jar, and give as housewarming or holiday gifts.


Having the dry ingredients already measured and ready is such a time-saver - just add the liquid ingredients and the yeast - and using my bread machine for the first bit of the work saves my wrists and some additional time.

The real time-saving feature is making half a dozen or more mixes at the same time. I line up several bowls or containers in a row, pull out my recipe, and start measuring the dry ingredients - flour, salt, etc - into the bowls. When finished, I pour the contents of each bowl into a zipper bag. Each bag has a label on it with the ingredients that need to be added when I'm ready to make a loaf.


When the breadmaker beeps, signaling that the dough cycle is finished, I turn the dough out onto the flour-covered counter and knead it. Then it's shaped and put into the greased pan (this Pyrex loaf pan below was my mother's), and left to rise in a warm place.

In my kitchen, the "warm place" is the oven which I've turned on to its lowest setting for a few minutes, then shut it off. I add the loaf pan when I shut the oven off - because once I forgot to shut it off and baked the unrisen bread dough. Ugh, don't do that!


When it's risen and ready to bake, I just turn the oven back on. You don't need to remove the dough while the oven preheats.

And then, finally, the warm loaf comes out of the oven and we let it cool down for 15 minutes - barely - before we cut into the loaf.


I have a Sanyo Bread Factory Plus machine that's very old (two decades, maybe?) and isn't even produced anymore. You might be able to find an older, inexpensive and still-working-great breadmaker at a yard sale or thrift shop.

Start with the recipes you use the most and already love. They are simple to adapt to make-ahead mixes by packaging the measured dry ingredients and adding the liquid ingredients and yeast when you're ready to make the bread.

The two recipes I make most of the time are Honey Oat Bread and Italian Herb Bread. I've also used Italian Herb dough to make pizza crust with delicious results.

HONEY OAT BREAD
1.5 lb loaf

Add the dry ingredients to a quart-size zipper bag:
3 cups bread flour
1 tsp salt
3/4 cup old-fashioned oats

Add a label to the bag that says:

ADD:
1 cup water
1.5 Tbsp vegetable oil
3 Tbsp honey (or molasses, which tastes wonderful but makes a denser loaf)
1.5 tsp yeast

BAKE: 30 minutes at 350°.

----------------

ITALIAN HERB BREAD
1.5 lb loaf

Add the dry ingredients to a quart-size zipper bag:
3 1/4 cups flour
1 tsp salt
2 Tbsp sugar
1 1/2 tsp dried marjoram
1 1/2 tsp dried basil
1 1/2 sp dried thyme

Transfer contents of the bowl into a zipper bag. Add a label to the bag that says:

ADD:
1 cup + 2 Tbsp water
1 1/2 Tbsp oil
1 1/2 tsp yeast

BAKE: 30 minutes at 350°.


"How to Make Your Own Bread Machine Mixes" is part of my
Homemade Convenience Food series. Check it out for more convenient,
cost-saving ways to prep your meals ahead.



This post has been shared at some of my favorite blog hops.


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My hope is to inspire you, and to encourage your homesteading plans and your dreams of a simple, self-reliant, God-dependent life. You can follow me at:
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12 comments:

  1. Sounds yummy. Had to PIN it.

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    Replies
    1. They are delicious, Deborah. Thank you for the PIN!

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  2. What a wonderful idea! I use my bread machine all the time for the dough cycle. Love your blog by the way!
    Laurie

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  3. This is the greatest tip, thanks. I got my first bread machine from my son who went to cash in aluminum cans and there sat the dented bread machine. It was made from Sears and thrown away because it was dented. I used it for the last 20 years and it finally died. They don't make that brand anymore, so I bought a new one. Some brand, but the new ones have a strange shape to the loaf. So, from now on I will do like you suggest: use it to mix the dough and rise, then finish it myself. Thanks.

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    1. That was a real find! Yes, this tip really opened my eyes too. I hope it helps!

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  4. What a wonderful thing to keep on hand, Kathi. I love the idea of these bread machine mixes, and both sound delicious. So nice you have your Mom's bread pan to use too! Shared on the Hearth and Soul Link Party Facebook page. Thank you for being a part of Hearth and Soul.

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    1. They are handy to have on hand, April. Thank you for sharing!

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  5. I love making bread and the best part of baking bread is eating it when it's still warm. Yummy! Thank you for sharing at Dishing it and Digging it link party. It's lovely having you and hope to see you tomorrow for a brand new link party. http://diy180site.blogspot.com/2016/11/dishing-it-and-digging-it-link-party-122.html

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    1. Thank you, Vanessa. I agree - bread is best when it's right out of the oven!

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  6. Brilliant! Can not wait to try this out! I am so glad you shared it with us at Country Fair BLog Party!

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    1. Thank you, Jan. By the way, this works with cake recipes, brownies, pancakes, anything you make from scratch regularly. Measure out the dry ingredients and add the wet ones when you're ready to make them.

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