This site uses affiliate links. See my full disclosure here.

August 8, 2011

Helping Your Horses Stay Cool in Summer



I don't think there's anything more peaceful-looking than a pair of horses standing together under a shade tree, side by side with one facing this way and the other facing that way, so that there is a tail to swish flies off the other one's head and neck. I wish I had a photo of that to show you, but I don't. It defines "cooperation."

There really isn't much to be done, in my opinion, for a horse to help it stay cool in the depths of summer, other than providing shade, ventilation and plenty of water. As long as these basics are provided, a horse will go where it is most comfortable.

Our horses have access to a large pasture as well as the barn and a run-in shed, and the pasture is ringed by woods with a small grove of trees in the middle, so "shade" and "ventilation" are taken care of.


Click here to subscribe to The Acorn, Oak Hill Homestead's weekly-ish newsletter.


Our current drought is so bad that the pond has shrunk to the point that the horses no longer have access to the water. There are four water troughs in their pasture that we check and fill in the morning and evening.

Ella plays in the water troughs, swishing her head back and forth to splash the water on her chest and generally have a cool fun party. She can almost empty a trough doing this, which is why we refill them twice a day.


I managed to grab a video one afternoon:



With a name like Splash, you know our black-and-white paint likes to play in the water too. He enjoyed pawing the water in the pond, back when there was water. These next two photos are from a previous year.



When hubby fills the troughs in the evening, Ella and Splash often come over so he can squirt them with the hose.



I have fly masks for all of the horses. Dakota has his on every day, because the pink skin around his blue eyes tends to sunburn very easily. Preventing sunburn isn't the intended function of a fly mask, but it works. His nose still sunburns though. He won't allow me to put sunscreen on his nose.


They all spend the afternoon in the barn, which has the deepest shade they can find. The spot way in the back of the barn is the most prized, and whichever horse gets there first doesn't want to give it up for anything. Flies generally don't like shade, so it gives the horses a reprieve.

The sustained heat is making them grumpy and cranky though. Usually they get along well, but there have been more spats lately. (I have to admit that the humans are getting grumpy and cranky too.)


Related Posts:
Keeping Goats Comfortable in the Summer Heat
How to Keep Chickens Cool in Summer



This post has been shared at some of my favorite blog hops.

~~~~~

My hope is to inspire you, and to encourage your homesteading plans and your dreams
of a simple, self-reliant, God-dependent life. Join me here:
Facebook | Pinterest | Subscribe via email

5 comments:

  1. Hey there,
    I don't know a lot about cooling horses. We had a horse for a while back in '07... but we haven't had any since.
    The goats usually take care of themselves as far as heat goes... here. It gets up aound 110 or 113 every summer here during some point.

    I am praying for your horses.
    Maybe if they are too hot, they would appreciate some big block of ice to chew on... I know some animals appreciate it... but I highly doubt that horses, cows, or goats would pay them much attention.

    Be blessed, love Carra

    ReplyDelete
  2. The "series" will continue with goats in a few days. ~smile~ The dogs and cats are on their own though; they can go wherever they wish and I trust they'll find the coolest spot to while away the hot afternoons.

    I used to put frozen 2-liter bottles of water in the rabbits' cages, but all 3 have died this year. It's been a brutal year.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hey Kathi,
    So sorry to hear of your rabbits. Is it dry there?

    Here we have humidity sometime 100%... and the heat doesn't seem to stress the livestock as quickly.

    Anyway... praying for you. Be blessed. Carra

    ReplyDelete
  4. It is drier than normal. Usually we have some humidity although nothing like the midwest and the east coast. Still, usually it is more humid than it is this summer.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Just wondering...air conditioners are very inexpensive now...if you can find one. They were sold out here in our area of MI in mid summer but we fortunately have central air and one portable a/c that can roll from room to room and just vent the hose out a window. There's also an a/c on the market that rolls from room to room that uses water and has no chemical output to the atmosphere...I'd have to ask hubby where he saw that in a catalog. They may help your smaller animals if they come inside the house such as rabbits, cats, dogs...and maybe even to place it in a portion of the barn or coop, etc. I'm not a farmer (no doubt you guessed) but do love animals and feel for all your extreme hardships in areas worse hit by this horrible weather. Hopefully by now you've had some relief.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for stopping by. I hope you will leave a comment - I would love to hear from you. If you wish to email me instead, please click here. Thank you!

Please note that anonymous comments are usually deleted unread because of the high amount of spam. Instead of commenting anonymously, consider choosing the NAME/URL option - just fill in your name, leaving a URL is optional.