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August 22, 2018

Green Tomatoes Galore! Harvesting and Preserving These Garden Goodies


What can you do with all those green tomatoes still on your vines when the first frost arrives?

As the days on the calendar are crossed off one by one, the chance of your first frost looms ever nearer. You've been keeping a watchful eye on both the weather and your tomato plants, which are still full of green tomatoes that seem to be in no hurry to change color.

Tomato plants are frost-sensitive and love hot, sunny weather. You know that the first frost is going to mean the end of your tomato harvest. Is it possible to force them to turn red faster, or will you have to bury them in the compost pile along with all that slimy, frost-killed foliage? Is there any hope?

Today I'm guest posting at the Minnesota Country Girl blog, where I'll share with you how you can save those tomatoes from the certain death caused by cold autumn nights. I'll show you how to predict a frost, how to encourage your tomatoes to ripen both on and off the vine, how you can use green tomatoes – and which ones to use – in recipes so you won't waste those late-to-ripen tomatoes. Adding them to the compost pile or feeding them to the chickens should be a last resort – at least they wouldn't be wasted, but let's eat them ourselves instead!

Wait, are green tomatoes safe to eat? I'll tell you in my guest post. And why would you want to? They are worth it: unripe tomatoes, while not as rich in nutrients as red, fully ripe tomatoes, still have health benefits: one serving is rich in antioxidants and vitamin C, contains 2 grams of protein and 2 grams of fiber, and has about 42 calories.


For the rest of this post, join me over at Minnesota Country Girl where I have the privilege of guest posting for Homestead Winter Prep: A Series of Harvesting and Preserving.


What can you do with green tomatoes? Here's how to predict a frost, ripen them on the vine and off the vine, plus recipes to use them up, here's what you can do with them!


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12 comments:

  1. We ended up unintentionally ripening some green tomatoes on our counter! My husband actually wanted to make some green tomato salsa, but we didn't get around to it fast enough. I'll have to remember to check out your post at Minnesota Country Girl when it starts to get closer to frost time. I definitely have let those tomatoes rot at the end of the season in the past.

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    1. That's funny, Danielle! I hope your husband can have some green tomato salsa this year.

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  2. I love fried green tomatoes! Just sliced up and fried in butter. Yummy!

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    1. I'm not a native-born Southerner - I'd never even heard of fried green tomatoes until the movie came out. :-)

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  3. I'm going to have to try making enchilada sauce with mine! What a great idea!

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  4. There are many ways to preserve and use green tomatoes. Found you on Simple Homestead Blog hop.

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    1. Always glad to see you, Candy!

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  5. Sonia9:30 AM

    When frost threatens your tomato plants, you can pull the plants up and hang them upside down somewhere they won't freeze (like a basement). The tomatoes will ripen gradually and you can have tomatoes off the vine for several more months.

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    1. That's one of the options I mention. :-)

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  6. We make green tomato mincemeat and relish. And the way those beautiful tomatoes are ripening, I need to be busy picking the green ones. This is a relish year!

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    Replies
    1. I'm glad you're having a good tomato year, Michele. That's awesome!

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