Goat Supplies You Need to Have on Hand



Whether you are a new goat owner or have had a small herd for awhile, check out this list to make sure you have the essentials your goats need.


Along with the equipment and items you'll need to have for your goats (buckets, hay feeders, collars and so on), you'll need to have some basic supplies on hand too.


Huh? you might ask. Aren't equipment and supplies the same thing? 


Not exactly. Equipment refers to items that are more permanent and long-lasting, such as buckets and hay feeders, while supplies are used up regularly, like feed and medications. I suppose we could call them consumable items for goats.


If you haven't read my "must-have list for goats" yet, you should. You'll find a list of the equipment I use most with my goats and what items I consider essential. In fact, you'll want these items on hand before you bring home your first goats.


The list of supplies in this post is designed to help you raise healthy, happy goats.  


This post contains affiliate links. You can read my full disclosure here.


Remember, goats are a commitment and a responsibility - you are responsible to keep them as healthy as you can. Learn as much as you can about goats and what is required to keep them safe and healthy.


Goat Minerals


Goats need minerals. If you don't provide them, you might not notice that there is a problem for several years, but eventually the lack of minerals will catch up to your goats' health. 


You'll start to notice that their coats are dull and coarse, even in the summer when they should be sleek and shiny.


And if you are breeding your goats and raising kids, eventually the kids will be born weaker and with more problems than in the past, and the does might have more complications as well.


So keep your goats heathy with free-choice loose minerals from the beginning.

Loose minerals for goats, one of the 5 consumable items you need when you have goats.

Goats should have free-choice access to goat minerals all the time. Buy a mineral feeder such as this one and locate it in a dry place where the minerals will not get wet. Attaching it to a fence or wall is ideal, so the goats can't spill the minerals or step in the feeder.


Buy a bag of loose minerals, not a mineral block. Goats prefer eating loose minerals instead of licking a mineral block; it's too hard for them to get enough minerals off a block to do them good.


Buy goat-specific minerals that are formulated for goats only. Don't buy a multi-species mineral for your goats, or a sheep and goat mineral. 


Goats need certain minerals in much higher quantities than other species - copper, for instance. Goats require a much higher amount of copper than sheep, so "sheep and goat minerals" will not be helpful for your goats. 


There are several brands of goat minerals available. If your goats don't seem to like one brand, try another, then stick to the one they like best, because minerals won't help your goat if your goat won't eat them.


When you first offer loose minerals to your goat, you may find that they empty the feeder very quickly. Keep an eye on it and add more when needed. After awhile your goats won't go through them so fast.


Dewormer - chemical or herbal


Goats harbor parasites and their eggs in their digestive and intestinal tracts. Stress, kidding and other events can cause these parasites to reproduce quickly inside your goats and cause problems in your herd.


You might have one goat that is more susceptible to parasites, or you may deal with worms in your entire herd. Don't overlook a goat that looks more straggly than the others.


Parasites can vary according to where you live. You can ask your veterinarian which chemical dewormer is recommended in your area. If needed, you can usually take a fecal sample to your vet for a fecal test without having to take the goat to the clinic.


Certain dewormers require a "withholding time" if you are milking your goat, or raising meat goats. In other words, if you give a particular type of chemical dewormer, you might have to discard the milk for a period of several days. Don't drink the milk!



You can use an herbal dewormer instead of a chemical dewormer, which is what I give my goats. My goal is to raise healthy, happy goats as naturally as possible, so I prefer to use an herbal dewormer. 


You can buy herbal dewormers online from Hoegger Goat Supply, Fir Meadow and Molly's Herbals


I use Hoegger Goat Supply's herbal dewormer. There is no milk withholding time when using this wormer. 


Herbal dewormers are given to goats regularly, unlike chemical dewormers which are given when there is a problem. Usually you give the goats a dose each day for several days, then once-weekly. 


In order to make it easy for me to remember, I "worm on Wednesday." You can read about how I give it to my goats here.


If you don't use an herbal dewormer, you will want to have a commercial (chemical) dewormer on hand.



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Baking Soda


Baking soda is important to have on hand when you have goats.


Baking Soda should be offered free choice to balance the pH in your goats' rumen and to keep their digestive systems running smoothly. 


Like free-choice goat minerals, the goats will eat it if they need it. Offer it in a feeder in a dry location.


I use so much baking soda that I buy it in these bulk bags.


Molasses


Molasses is one of the five important items when you own goats. Use it to perk up a tired or cold goat, and to mix herbal wormers into dosage balls.


Molasses is the perfect energy drink for goats. Mixed in warm water it's a treat for a cold goat in the winter, and provides energy to a tired doe that has just kidded.


I mix herbal dewormer powder with molasses to make dosage balls.


Nutri-Drench


Nutri-Drench is one of those things that I don't need often, but when I need it, I need it right now. I learned that lesson when I made an emergency trip to the feed store to buy a bottle and they had to order it for me.


Formulated for both sheep and goats, Nutri-Drench is my go-to when a goat needs a quick boost of energy or nutritional support. Give it to newborn kids that aren't as peppy as you'd like them to be, a doe that has just delivered kids, a goat with diarrhea or showing signs of heat stress in summer.


Nutri-Drench should be administered with a dosage syringe so it gets into your goat's system as fast as possible.


Wound spray


My go-to wound spray is Vetericyn Plus. Simply spray on a clean cut or wound to relieve itching, help prevent infection and promote healing. Unlike iodine, there’s no stinging or burning.


There are, of course, other products on the market. Choose the one you like best and can find in your area.


Feed, hay and water




Of course, you'll also need grain and hay for your goats. Contrary to what many people think, goats are very picky eaters. They don't eat tin cans and license plates! If you expect your goats to browse, make sure there is enough for them to eat.


You'll need enough hay to get your goats through the winter. Because I raise dairy goats and want the best-tasting milk, my goats are fed hay year-round.


Many goats dislike grass, including mine. Goats are browsers rather than grazers. They prefer brush, shrubs, many weeds, and the bark of young trees. They like poison ivy and blackberry thickets too. Be aware that weeds and brush can make your goats' milk taste rather funky.


They are also very fond of rosebushes and vegetable plants. Unfortunately many common landscape plants are toxic to goats including azaleas and hydrangeas. 


You'll also need to provide fresh water for your goats at all times. Goats dislike brakish, stagnant water and prefer clean, fresh water. 



Goat Treats


If you'd like to spoil your goats occasionally, keep some goat treats on hand. 


Or, use my recipe for molasses horse treats to make your own. They're not just for horses, my goats love them too.


Want to print this post for your goat binder or homesteading notebook?


Readers have often asked me for an easy way to print some of my posts for their goat binder or homesteading notebook. You asked, I listened!





With fewer, smaller images and no ads, the printable is designed to be printer-friendly, to be kept in your goat binder or homesteading notebook. For even more economy, set your printer to “black and white” to save on color ink.


You'll find the 10-page printable in my Etsy shop



There are many items and supplies in my goat first-aid kit that I consider pretty essential too. You can check out that post here.


You'll find all of my posts on raising goats here.


For more homesteading and simple living inspiration, subscribe to The Acorn, Oak Hill Homestead's weekly-ish newsletter, and join me on FacebookInstagram and Pinterest.


Supplies you should have on hand for your goats - image of a brown goat






This post contains affiliate links.



Related posts:
Ten Must-Have Items for Your Goats
How to Make Dosage Balls for Goats
The Best Goat Fencing




This post has been shared at some of my favorite blog hops.


~~~~~

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17 comments

  1. Great list Kathi, when we are milking I use the Hoeggers herbals too.

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  2. Thanks, Sandra. It's great that there is no milk withdrawal time with herbal wormers, isn't it?

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  3. Sadly, I can only read this and dream. I would love to have my own goats, but we have no place for another structure on our land, due the layout and location of the well and septic field. But I do love buying local goat products at farmers markets. BTW, my most recent post is on goat milk ice cream bases, if you're interested.

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  4. Janet, I'm sorry you can't have goats of your own, but hopefully you can visit some of those farms and get a "goat fix". Thank you for supporting your local goat farms and farmers market. I'm headed over to read your post.

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  5. I love it when the list is short and simple! I'm sure your goats are healthy and well-loved. Thanks for sharing this today on The Maple Hill Hop!

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  6. Good list! I've been reading up on goats lately since we hope to add some to our homestead later this year. I'll have to refer back to all your helpful goat posts as we get closer to bringing them home!

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  7. I'm a wonderful "goat enabler", Tammy, so if you have any questions I hope you'll ask!

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  8. I appreciate your sharing this info. I'm considering getting goats but I have questions no one seems to answer.

    1) the goat de-wormer you shown says you'd be giving doses of it "weekly thereafter". Does that mean you are on a constant regimen with de-worming only because it's a natural not chemical de-wormer?

    2) If you were going off grid, how would you replace these items? I know that people have kept goats for millenia (so to speak)in places without stores, and I don't want to get trapped in a feed-store-supplied cycle with goats.
    (At this time I'm working to get off all store dependence with the chickens).
    Thanks.

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  9. These are excellent questions, Illoura. I wish your comment had an email address so I could go into detail; I also visited your website but couldn't find contact info.

    Yes, the wormer must then be given once a week each week afterwards, so it would be an ongoing process. I've looked into planting those herbs in my goats' pasture as an alternative, and am working on that.

    I think I'll talk about this in a future post!

    I'd love to hear how you are moving your chickens away from feed store dependency!

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  10. If/When I get goats, I'll have to refer back to this. I made sure to add it to my "Goat" bookmarks folder. Thanks for taking the time to share this on The 104 Homestead Friday Blog Hop!

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  11. If/when you get goats, Jessica, please feel free to ask if you have any questions!

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  12. Anonymous1:46 PM

    I'm getting my first goat this week and I didn't know that I needed to worm him each week.besides grass what do I need to start off with..

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    1. Hi! Weekly worming is for an herbal wormer; if you want to use commercial wormers it's a different schedule. I don't use those so I'm not sure of the current recommendations.

      Goats aren't necessarily crazy about grass, some like it more than others. They love weeds and brush. Mine will eat hay but don't care for grass.

      Here is a list of the ten items I call my "must haves."

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  13. I recently bought oat hay for bedding thinking it was oat straw. I am told the difference is oat hay is cut and baled with seed intact. Straw is like wheat straw left over after wheat is harvest. My goats are eating it I can't tell if they are bloated or just eating a lot of it. Have you ever fed this.

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    1. I haven't fed oat hay to goats, only to horses. Yes, it contains the seed head. It might be a good idea to remove it and keep a close eye on the goats for a bit. That's what I would do.

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  14. What are the syringes for?

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    1. That's a good question and I see that I didn't list the purposes in my post. Syringes have many uses on my homestead. The obvious reason is for giving shots, but it's not the only use. #1 I give CDT shots to my goats each year. #2 Without needles, syringes are the best way to deliver medications and preparations by mouth. Remove the needle, draw up the correct amount and squirt the med in the back of the goat's mouth. I do this mainly with anti-coccidia medication for the goat kids, but if you need to give an adult goat (or a dog or cat) a liquid medication by mouth, a large, needle-less syringe is the easiest way. Thanks for asking!

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